digital fabrication – a pipe

4 08 2008

“A pipe”, praca wykonana w ramach zajec Digital Fabrication w Iaac pod kierownictwem Marty Male-Alemany, prezentuje mozliwosci jakie otwiera modelowanie 3D polaczone bezposrednio z technologia wycinania. Nasz wycinek jest czescia wiekszej instalacji na ktora skladaja sie rozne projekty polaczone w jedna calosc ( jak na zdjeciu ). Wszystkie elementy modelowane byly w Rhino a nastepnie skladane w calosc. Ponizej widac cala instalacje oraz nasza czesc : proces skladania, finalny projekt i pliki gotowe do wyciecia:

A pipe, project done in the Digital Fabrication course in Iaac under tutorship of Marta Male-Alemany, conststing simply of vertical and horizontal sections, presents possibilities and potentials of 3D modelling directly transferred into lasercut files. The one was a part of a bigger installation of differentiated parts that come together, that is hanging in the hall of Iaac. All the elements were drawn in Rhino and then assembled. Above you can see the whole assembled installation and  our part: process of assembling, the final part and lasercut files:

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14 responses

16 01 2009
andrew scott

i love this work.

i am interested in the modeling process used to create the egg carton slots. i owuldlike to apply it to some sculpture that i am working on.

any help would be appreciated

thanks
andrew scott

16 01 2009
afsart

GREAT STUFF,

I am interested in exploring some of these techniques.
could you share the rhino pipeline for creating the eggcarton notches?

Thanks,

Andrew Scott

17 01 2009
agata

thanx a lot. I would like to help you but I don’t really know what exactly do you need. Could you specify more what would help you?
best,
agata

25 01 2009
andrew scott

agata,

I am interested in how the half lap slots are set up in the rhino model.

here is my first attempt at it.
http://www.flickr.com/photos/afsart/sets/72157612810231500/

thanks for our reply.

andrew

2 02 2009
peruvianfriend

very amazing, can you give more details about your job .
how do you work with rhino? i would like to know because I’m student of architecture and i would like to make phisycal models like your work…
please i’ve learned recently,how to use rhino and it’s very surprising.
also, how to use rhino script. there are pages but, all of them are English and I don’t know some words very well. thanksssssss

2 02 2009
agatakycia

our approach was as following: 1. we created both cross-sections and longitudinal sections. 2. then we created intersections between them. 3. we generated small cones along the intersection lines, moved them half a way and substructed them from the sections, which is how we got the half lap slots.4. finally we projected all the elements to create CNC-lasercut files.
hope it will help you.
good luck with your work,
agata and krzysztof

4 02 2009
afsart

agata,

thanks for the info, i applied a similar process. i am currently working on a grasshopper script to automate the process. did you check out my example on the flickr site? I would be interested in you comments. once again. thanks for sharing.

andrew

4 02 2009
Solving the Mystery of the Half Lap Joint « afsart: andrew f. scott

[…] examples I was able to figure out the process pipeline. I also communicated with Agata Kycia at the Workshops Factory who confirmed my approach. This provided the inspiration for the work above. This is the first of […]

17 02 2009
agata

i checked your pictures on flickr. looks very nice. the only thing i would recommend if you have a chance to experiment with this subject more, is to think of the sections as following the shape and expressing in the same time the most important aspects that you want to emphasise ( playing with thickness or intensity ), instead of straight cuts through the sculpture. think of the advantages that you could have from that fabrication technique when using them intentionally.
good luck,
agata

18 02 2009
andrew scott

agata,

you a right on target.

that model was an experiment to confirm the process pipeline. I am working on a revision of model that focuses on the expression of both the interior and exterior contours of the form.

will post soon.

andrew

2 03 2009
afsart

agata,

question,

i have been cutting my slots to the thickness of my materials.
after the first section is glued the tolarenences becomes very tight.
do you make your slots slightly thicker than your material??

thanks again

9 03 2009
andrew scott

agata,

problem solved.
version 2 posted.

Andrew F. Scott | Serial Studies II

9 03 2009
agata

hello,
i saw the new one, looks nice. much more expressive then the previous one. i think it could be also nice to experiment with sections that aren’t paralell one to another and where distances between them vary. but anyway good job!

13 03 2009
andrew scott

Thanks,

The most challenging part was getting the slot sizes right. computers are accurate not perfect. Some good ideas about adding variety in spacing and orientation. my only worry is that when the slot slices are not parallel I will run into interlocking problems because the laser cuts at 90 degrees.

Thanks for the exchange. it helps.

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