Warsaw Cultural Centre – Urban Scale Model

31 10 2010

The last part of the Warsaw Cultural Centre (WCC)  project was about an urban scale model in 1:1000 scale. Its purpose was to show all crucial relations between the WCC and its direct surrounding. Project site plays important role in the city structure of Warsaw by being transportation and commercial hub. Thus it was necessary to take all this isseus into consideration and measure it by numeric parameters, what was later used for project generation. The picture below presents part of the city,  which would be highly influenced by the project and that is why it was chosen to be finally modelled.

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The urban scale model consists of two parts, which vary in terms of its status and a fabrication technique. The first part represents a piece of Warsaw city centre in the form it will look like in the next 3 years, meaning it shows also projects which are now under construction. It was laser cut in many layers and at the end put together.  Warsw Cultural Centre was the second part of the model. The form of the project was created by using 3D printed technique.





Warsaw Cultural Centre – Prototyping Process

30 10 2010

The main purpose of Warsaw Cultural Centre (WCC) project was to prove that computational approach can lead the design till final materialization in a much faster and effective way. Thus part of the WCC form was chosen to be finally fabricated in 1:25 scale. For this purpose scrpit was written in VB Rhino Script to generate all the elements of the project. The construction method was slightly adjusted to the scale of the prototype (some elements would be to small if we use 1:1 scale procedure), however in full scale process it will follow exactly the same logic and the script will need minor changes.

The picture above shows the part chosen for fabrication, including all the elements of the structure and cladding system. The movie below presents a process of generating all these elements by a couple of rhinoscripts. In a first part simple fugures are selected, and then based on their geometry the final form of the prototype is created.

Two CNC techniques were used to create final prototype. Construction beams, floor plates and joints were cut using laser cuting. A seperate script was written to unfold all the surfaces and prepare files for the laser cutting machine. On the other hand cladding panels were formed by using CNC 3 axis milling machine. The prototype, consisting of more then two thousands elements was cut and milled in 74 hours and was assembled in 22 hours.

Project construction method was first developed and tested on Interwoven System Project, which was a graduation research project at the TU Delft in the Hyperbody studio (posted on the website a couple of months ago).





Warsaw Cultural Centre – TU Delft Graduation Project

27 10 2010

Warsaw Cultural Centre was a graduation project at the TU Delft in the Hyperbody studio. The project was developed under tutorship of dr. Nimish Biloria, dr. ing. Henriette Biere and Martin Sobota. I would like thank them for all the help.

URBAN / ARCHITECTURAL PROBLEM

Plac Defilad is a main square in the city centre of Warsaw and despite of the fact that it seems to be the most interesting and valuable place for urban development it still stays almost empty. There have been lots of discussions about its future appearance, and many urban plans were made. However none of these investigations were finally accepted and still there is no clear decision how Plac Defilad should look like in the next ten or twenty years.

The design task was to propose a new, alternative solution for Warsaw’s city centre. It needed to be multifunctional project, consisting of cultural, business and commercial activities. The big challenge was also to integrate all different transportation facilities and create here real social hub.

PROJECT IDEA

The idea of the project derives directly from the urban structure of the city of Warsaw. The site and its surrounding was fully destroyed during the second world war and it is still full of undeveloped areas and empty lots of land. There is a lack of proper city structure with a geometry of streets and squares. Thus the form of project starts from a ‘bounding box’ of the site, including all the city regulations. Then this box is gradually eaten away at, based on the site characteristics and parameters. It gave a final form which in some places still kept box geometry, nicely filling the gap in the city. However functional configuration inside follows geometries from the site analysis program and is not constrained by the outer bounding box.

METHOOLOGY

The purpose of the WCC project was to show how computational techniques can be used on different design stages, starting from conceptual sketches and finishing with preparing files for materialization. The crucial point was to introduce them not as one ‘master’ tool, which solves all the problems, but as a set of small interconnected programs solving separately specific issues. In that case that was always possible to rethink all the decisions and create feed-back loops to find optimal solutions.

The design process started from a site analysis and the first functional diagrams. For this purpose computational procedure was written in Processing language. The result of that was briefly describing project geometry and providing internal communication plan.

On that base in the next step a couple of scripts (Rhino VB scripts) were used to generate exact geometry of the project and develop parametric skin components, which were able to be driven by all gathered information.

Another important part was to introduce a tool to create customized and unique structural strategy for the project. In that sense construction methods were following design ideas, not another way around.

In the last part of the project separate code was written to generate files for final materialization. Produced prototype in 1:25 scale was fabricated by using CNC techniques like laser cutting and 3-axis milling machine. More information about the fabrication process and final appearance of the prototype will be posted soon.





Protospace 3.0 Mock-up

7 06 2010

The video presents process of assembling Protospace 3.0 mock-up. The projet was done during msc 2 Hyperbody studio class at the TU Delft (in collaboration with ONL).
WF’s Agata Kycia and Krzysztof Gornicki were involved in 3D modelling and creating generative procedure for the design. The project was developed in Rhinoceros, using rhinoscript.
Later on projet was continued in the Hyperbody Research Group mainly by Owen Slootweg and Jelle Feringa. Presented prototype is located in a new Protospace Laboratory at TU Delft.

The purpose of the project was to explore new possiblities in 3d modeling and digital fabrication techniques. Thus pavilion the form of the pavilion was scripted using Rhinoscript and later on all the generated components were hot wired out of EPS foam. Next each one of them was coated to make it waterproof and fully structural. There are also some wooden elements embedded inside them to reinforce floor of the pavilion.
More information about the project you can find here: posts presenting process of generating Protospace 3.0 form and publication about it.

Pictures taken by Gustavo Nascimento





Protospace 3.0 – design proposal/generative procedure

11 09 2009

“ Protospace is a vehicle for transdisciplinary research, education and design in form of a virtually augmented transaction space”(Kas Oosterhuis). In order to design that research laboratory for collaborative design in real-time, we were using a generative procedure that enabled people from different specializations ( styling, manufacturing, structural group, interactive group, MEP group ) to work simultanously on the project and inform each other. A component based methodology that we were using, allowed us to incorporate different functions by controlling parameters of one topology of the component. The components were supposed to be 3D milled pieces of reinforced EPS.

Protopace 3.0 was a design task for msc2 studio at the Hyperbody Research Group/TU Delft. We were responsible for form modelling and creating generative procedure in rhinoscripting

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Catmull-Clark Mesh Smoothing For Rhino

13 07 2009

I have written a free C++ plugin for Rhino that allows for Catmull-Clark style mesh smoothing. I always loved the type of tessellation that was possible to create using Maya or Max so I made the same algorithm available to Rhino.

In the link below there are 2 plug-ins one is called “catsmooth” and the other is called “fixmesh”.  Catsmooth is the smoothing plug-in, it is a work in progress so for now it will only work on closed meshes. The other one “fixmesh” will rebuild a mesh to have the minimum number of vertices, this is necessary because some of the mesh primitives in Rhino have extra vertices for some reason. Before running the plug-in check that the number of verticies don’t far outweigh the number of faces, if they do run “fixmesh” first. Once you have run the command unify the mesh normals using “UnifyMeshNormals”.  Enjoy.

download here

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Structural Evolution: Ansys and Rhino

2 07 2009

While I was at IaaC i chose for my thesis to create an evolutionary algorithm which transforms a simple rectangular shaped bridge into a muscular form. The algorithm was implemented using Rhinoscript  and Ansys to create a looping program that would iteratively transform a surface based on its localized stress values.  The script would import the stress data from Ansys via text files and either thicken or thin the form at each of its nodes.

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The result of 19 iterations is the form which is seen below alongside of images of the original and final forms.

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In the end the resultant form used less material and displayed a much higher and more evenly distributed factor of safety.

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